My Home is on the Mountain

About the Book: Bibliography

Here are most of the sources I used while writing the book.  


People of the Appalachia Mountains and the South

 
Becker, Jane S.
SELLING TRADITION: APPALACHIA AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF AN AMERICAN FOLK 1930-1940
(Chapel Hill NC: The University of North Carolina Press, 1998)
[I think this is one of the two most important studies of the Appalachian peoples that I have come across. It is essential reading. (The second one is below.) Academic study of the interference of the outside world into Appalachia, already now a concept that created its reality, as do-gooders came to make the natives even more truly native, by outside standards, than they were, and the lack of benefit the natives earned. Intensely moving and enraging.]
Crowe, Thomas Rain
ZORRO'S FIELD
(Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2006)
[The poet Thomas Rain Crowe decided to do a Thoreau and go back to the land in North Carolina. I thought it would be interesting to read, and it was. He lived without electricity or job in order to experience life in the woods, observing both the natural world around him and himself. As a poet, he brings his awe, his delight, his frustrations, and his sadness to life. The fact that this beautiful part of the hills was razed and a big shed for storing equipment was built there finishes the book on a note of horror.]
Eller, Ronald D.
MINERS, MILLHANDS AND MOUNTAINEERS: INDUSTRIALIZATION OF THE APPALACHIAN SOUTH, 1880-1930
(Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1995 c1982)
[Good overview of the mountaineer society and culture, one where the poorest farmer saw himself equal to anyone. Chapter on the logging industry makes tough reading for anyone who prefers the environment not to be destroyed.]
Finger, John R.
TENNESSEE FRONTIERS. Three Regions in Transition
(Bloomington IN: Indiana University Press, 2001)
[Covers the southern Appalachias as part of a wider study. A depressing read, as the earlier European inroads into the area became, after the American Revolution, a rapacious sweep, led by white supremacists. The author nevertheless shows that no frontier is ever cut off from the world; the world that makes the frontier is only an extreme example of the norm.]
Fisher, Noel C.
WAR AT EVERY DOOR: Partisan Politics and Guerrilla Violence in East Tennessee, 1860-1869
(Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997)
[Mentions, without going into too much detail, the burning out of Unionist families from their farms and homes by Confederates, but also covers the reverse.]
Garland, Jim
WELCOME THE TRAVELER HOME: Jim Garland's Story of the Kentucky Mountains
(Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 1983)
[Garland was raised in the hill of Kentucky and, although he wanted to escape, he ended up in the coal mines and became a courageous union activist in the early 1930s, helping to organise the massive strike in 1931/32, that is, exactly the time in which my story is set. I found this a very moving and often upsetting book, particularly the details of his and his community's oppression. Classism is not something Americans talk about much, but by jingo they know how to dish it out.]
Hall, Joseph S.
MOUNTAIN SPEECH IN THE GREAT SMOKIES
(Washington, DC: National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1937)
[Irritating attempt to capture the dialect of the Appalachian people while trying to capture their quaintness.]
Garber, Aubrey
MOUNTAIN-ESE. Basic Grammar for Appalachia
(Radford VA: Commonwealth Press Inc, 1976)
[A phrase book of Appalachian ways of saying things. Perhaps in 1976, when this was published, these seemed unique to the area, but I think by this time that a good half had already got out into the wider population. "Hard as nails" for instance, or "smack dab". Others are simply the local pronunciation, e.g. "fanger" for "finger". I worked through this to see if there were specific and striking phrases I should not ignore, until I was discourged from using anything but the lightest peppering of dialect. Wise advice.]
Hendrickson, Robert
MOUNTAIN RANGE. A Dictionary of Expressions from Appalachia to the Ozarks
(New York: Facts on File, Inc., 1997)
[Regional expressions of the mountain people down to Arkansas. He adds some phrases that clearly are not idioms, but must have struck him as poetic and local phrasing, and that seems a good choice to me. The book's one extreme benefit was to stop me from calling anyone "Peter".]
Jordan-Bychkov, Terry G.
THE UPLAND SOUTH: THE MAKING OF AN AMERICAN FOLK REGION AND LANDSCAPE
(Santa Fe: NM and Harrisonburg, VA: Center for American Places, 2003)
[Makes the case, through selected specific examples, of a new cultural development in early Tennessee that then spread west to become a distinct American folk-style. A little too enamored of dog-trot cabins to note that his own evidence suggests a preponderance of saddle-bag style (which is the style of the old Fitch log house). His enthusiasm for the subject is everywhere evident, his arguments convincing, and supported by my other research.]
 
Kephart, Horace
OUR SOUTHERN HIGHLANDERS
(Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1976 c1913)
[As far as I know the first book about the southern mountaineers to talk about them as they were without romanticising them or making them into caricatures. The fact that he was a hunter and a man who enjoyed an outdoor life must have helped him be accepted. For this novel, I started reading a lot of books written pre-1930 about the mountaineers, and almost immediately stopped with 99% of them, once I realised I was reading yet another book determined to see the ordinary farming people of the Appalachias as something other than ordinary, real, people. (These mostly wanted to see them as unspoied "children of nature" or amusing and quaint country folk, the way the English saw the rural Irish in the 19th century.) Kephart I read through.]
Lewis, Ronald L.
TRANSFORMING THE APPALACHIAN COUNTRYSIDE: Railroads, Deforestation, and Social Change in West Virginia, 1880-1920
(Chapel Hill NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1998)
[Described the same processes that were happening in Tennessee before the introduction of the Smoky Mountains National Park, but no park came to West Virginia, and so ecological and economic disaster followed. It is hard to read about the people of the Great Smokies having to leave their homes, hard to witness the ecological degradation of the park from its founding to now as a result of adjacent pollution, but one looks upon West Virginia and thinks "this is what the Smokies almost became."]
 
Madden, Robert R, and T. Russell Jones
MOUNTAIN HOME: THE WALKER FAMILY FARMSTEAD
(Washington, DC: U.S. Dept of the Interior/National Park Service, 1977)
[A short book looking at the Walker family, famous for the sisters who lived in their family home until their deaths. They had a 'fly-brush' over their dinner table that I refer to in the novel. Because many photos of the Walker family survive, and the fact that they lived in a log house, has made it easy to celebrate them as part of an old mountaineer and "authentic" lifestyle, instead of the hard work it was.]
Miles, Emma Bell
THE SPIRIT OF THE MOUNTAINS
(New York: James Pott & Company, 1905)
[Miles spent most of her life living in or near the mountains, and her love for them and her neighbours is very clear, although she is clear-eyed. Her section on the local music is interesting and she quotes lyrics throughout. Miles, with Kephart see above and Sheppard see below are the three contemporary writers that strike me as having the most respect for the mountain people, the least condescension, and a refreshing lack of indulgence of myth.]
Neal, John Randolph
DISUNION AND RESTORATION IN TENNESSEE
(New York: The Knickerbocker Press, 1899)
[A Unionist looks at Tennessee's participation, such as it was, in the Civil War, with a chapter on the loyal eastern part (that is, uplands part) of the state. The mountains were almost totally without slavery, due to their culture and their crops, but the plantations in the lowlands immediately below them were as slave-dependent as the rest of the south, for their crops demanded intensive hand labour and thus huge numbers of workers, and slavery is the cheapest way to obtain them. One can only be glad that the North came in to end the war for Tennesseans quite early, so that African-Americans could get themselves out.]
Nelson, Louise K.
COUNTRY FOLKLORE 1920S & 1930S ... and that's the way it was
(Waynesville NC: self-published, 1997)
[Nelson began writing for her local paper and put together her articles for this book. Lots of useful small details of rural life at the time of my story, e.g. boxed suppers, canning, stringing up beans to dry.]
Noe, Kenneth W.
THE CIVIL WAR IN APPALACHIA: COLLECTED ESSAYS
(Alexandria VA, Virginia History Series, 1997)
[Histories of the Civil War do not often address the tangled conflict in the Appalachias, where divisions of class shaped divisions of politics. This is worth reading.]
Norton, Herman A.
RELIGION IN TENNESSEE 1777-1945
(Knoxville TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1997 c1981)
[A slim book covering a long time period. Includes the in-coming of all the denominations and the flowering of the Baptist churches, as well as discussing the social and political impact of organised religion in the area.]
O'Brien, Sean Michael
MOUNTAIN PARTISANS: GUERRILLA WARFARE IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS, 1961-1865
(Westport CT, Praeger Publishers, 1999)
[Essential study of the complex loyalties, battle-lines and politics of the region. Unbelievably expensive book, and one crying out for a reasonably-priced reprint.]
Raine, James Watt
THE LAND OF SADDLE-BAGS. A Study of the Mountain People of Appalachia
(New York: Council of Women for Home Missions and Missionary Education Movement in the United States and Canada, 1924)
[Having already read Kephart (see above) I was surprised to find so much so familiar, until I realised that Raine seems to have helped himself liberally. I sighed as I came to "Elizabethan" and "feuds"; if the writer knew the mountain people as well as he claims to, he was certainly comfortable writing what his readers expected rather than what was true. I note with amusement the publisher of this dishonest book.]
Rohrbough, Malcolm J.
THE TRANS-APPALACHIAN FRONTIER. People, Societies, and Institutions, 1775-1850
(New York: Oxford University Press, 1978)
[The Appalachians are not the focus of the book, which is about the expansion of the United States not only in the "Old North West" but also in the south as Americans moved toward and into the Great Plains. This period of American history is fascinating to me, as I see it as the period when America became itself. It is not a story to admire, save for respect for the vigor of the expansion.]
 
Sheppard, Muriel Earley
CABINS IN THE LAURELS. Photographs by Bayard Wootten
(Chapel Hill NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1935)
[I found this an appreciative, honest and respectful account of a North Carolina Appalachian community into which the author came when her husband was posted there. I did not feel the author looked down on the people she lived among, although she clearly saw them as 'other' in many ways (as they saw her). The photographs were taken by Bayard Wootten, who appears to have come up for a day and used one family, as you can tell, and made sure his photos displayed the usual stereotypes. I don't know if he or the University Press editors supplied the obnoxious and insulting captions; I do know it cannot have been the author, who stresses over and over again how hard the local people worked and what fine craftsmen they were. She wrote a book about real working people's lives, and the captions turned them all into amusing lazy hillbillies, making a mockery of her text. The captions are offensive. And yet the text is not.]
 
Shapiro, Henry D.
APPALACHIA ON OUR MIND. The Southern Mountains and Mountaineers in the American Consciousness, 1970-1920
(Chapel Hill NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1978)
[This is the other essential book on Appalachia (see see above). Addresses the formation of every stereotype of the southern mountain person you can think of and how prejudiced reportage, so-called sociology, and sentimental and falsifying fiction gave us the image we have today, and how the image was used by outsiders to meddle into these people's lives. Luckily, I read this very early in the writing of the novel, and I thereafter steered clear of 'mountain novels' that were fiction built on fiction, and to be very suspicious of 'studies' of the Uplands South. This book concentrates on the created romance and myth of the Appalachias, as compared to the reality. So much of what we believe is false: real this and Becker and you will be the wiser for it.]
Shifflet, Crandall A.
COAL TOWNS. Life, Work, and Culture in Company Towns of Southern Appalachia 1880-1960
(Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1994)
[I had to be aware of coal-mining, although it barely enters the story, and found this a surprising book in many ways. It moved me away from the stereotypes I held. It looks at the reality of coal-mining towns. People went to these and worked there because it gave them a better life. A good corrective to the idea that coal-towns bad, moutain farms good. I was much struck by the relations between white and African-American miners, and also by evidence that the company store, reviled in song, was not always terrible, but often much valued by its captive customers.]
Smith Arnold R.
APPALACHIA: AS I REMEMBER IT
(Tuscon AZ: Hats Off Books, 2001)
[Memories of a southern Kentucky man about growing up in the late 1930s and early 1940s, so a little later than the time of my story.]
Tennessee Historical Commission, Sponsored by
TENNESSEE OLD AND NEW 1796-1946. Sesquicentennial Edition. In two volumes
(Nashville TN: The Tennessee Historical Society 1948)
[A collection of papers and talks by and for the Tennessee Historical Socierty and collected together. Second volume is mostly short biographies. First volume has some humdingers. One article explains that women's suffrage was considered a bad idea because women would then want to have sex with Black men. I am not making this up. The essay on the Civil War in Tennessee perhaps does not realise that it reveals the entire series of events as feeble and almost not worth the contempt it engenders. The one useful fact I gleaned was that Maryville had a music college in the early 1800s, so I had my permission to make classical music a thing in this region.]
Watkins, Floyd C. and Charles Hubert Watkins
YESTERDAY IN THE HILLS
(Athens GA: University of Georgia Press, 2000 c1963)
[I am very fond of rambling books like this one: one anecdote after another, as if you were sitting beside the speaker and he was talking of times gone by. These sorts of books reveal ways of thinking and attitudes that are not found in scholarly studies, for instance, detailed information on farming (pulling fodder, page 67). Although about farm life in north Georgia, what it describes shows little difference from books about the Appalachia region. with a lot of details hard to come by unless it is from people remininiscing, such as going to work in the fields early every day, dosing oneself with homemade medicines, and so on. The frontispiece photograph showing hand-ploughing.]
Williams, John Alexander
APPALACHIA: A HISTORY
(Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002)
[Covers the entire area, so Great Smoky Mountains is only part of the history he discusses. The author is from the area and debunks the myths of the Appalachians, covering the region's development, noting that this is not a uniform single culture, but a place of many cultures. Perhaps a little dryer than Shapiro and Becker (see above).]
Wilson, Shannon H., ed.
THE CIVIL WAR IN APPALACHIA: COLLECTED ESSAYS
(Knoxville TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2004)
[As with O'Brien (see above), these essays cover the complex motives and loyalties of the mountain people. A number of essays look at the ways in which the war impoverished and disrupted mountain communities.]
W.P.A.
TENNESSEE: A GUIDE TO THE STATE
(New York: Viking Press, 1939)
[One of the trememdously useful W.P.A. guides written in the 1930s. I wanted to know about the train stations and bus station in Knoxville, even though Knoxville is not Charleville. The section on p.340 about the handicrafts trade/servitude is a very good summary.]
 

Music

Baba Yaga Music
OLD-TIME AND APPALACHIAN FIDDLE MUSIC
(babayagamusic.com)
[Comprehensive and scholarly website with a lot of detail, and links to audio, on the history of this music and the musical modes, structure and geographical spread of styles. Impressive.]
Bacharach, A. L. (ed.)
THE MUSICAL COMPANION: A Compendium for All Lovers of Music
(London: Victor Gollancz Ltd, 1946 c1934)
[First written in 1934, although in England, this was a way for me to get the sense of muscial attitudes and musical culture close to Cecilia's and Airey's time.]
 
Barne, Kitty
LISTENING TO THE ORCHESTRA
(London: J. M. Dent and Sons Ltd, 1942)
[An introduction to classical concert music and what to know to get the best of one's listening, either via radio or in the concert hall.]
Benson, Joan
The Clavichord in 20th Century America. LIVRO DE HOMENAGEM A MACARIO SANTIAGO KASTNER
(Lisboa: Fundacao Calouste Gulbenkian, Servico de Musica, 1992)
[A thorough short history. The clavichord was not as strange an instrument in 1931 Tennessee as might be imagined.]
Bufwack, Mary A. and Robert K. Oermann
FINDING HER VOICE: The Saga of Women in Country Music
(New York: Crown Publishers, Inc., 1993)
[Great detail, dates, names of singers and bands, covering everything, including protest songs from the Depression, but never really faces the facts of women in the industry. Over and over in documentaries, women in the business talk about the limitations put on their careers, but only once do the authors mention that female performers could not travel without a male companion (it was even tough with a sister), but the spirit of this book is positive and "can do", so I assume the darker side was not dwelt upon.]
Carse, Adam
ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING. A Textbook for Students and Amateurs
(London: Augener Ltd, 1929)
[I tried always to get information as close to the date of the story as possible, so that I didn't "over jump" what would be known at the time, here by Niehoff and Jurevič.]
 
Cazden, Norman, Herbert Haufrecht and Norman Studer
NOTES AND SOURCES FOR FOLK SONGS OF THE CATSKILLS
(Albany NY: State University of New York Press, 1982)
[A reference book, very dense and scholarly, and the only reference I have for the old, old (medieval-old) song My Home is on the Mountain. Sadly, the early research I did online I did not bookmark, and one valuable website in particular has disappeared. I have only my written notes.]
Charpentier, Marc
BROADWAY NORTH: MUSICAL THEATRE IN MONTREAL IN THE 1920S
(Montreal: McGill University, thesis, 1999)
[Covers popular music, but touches upon orchestral performances.]
Clark, Frances Elliott (Manager, Education Activities, Education Division, RCA Victor)
READY REFERENCE CLASSIFICATION OF VICTOR RECORDS. Illustrating Music Appreciation and Music History
(Camden NJ: RCA Victor, Inc., 1931)
[RCA Victor's complete record catalogue dressed up as a reference source. Lists their recordings under headings such as "College Songs", "String Quartets" and so forth, and also arranged under subject headings such as "Rhythmns for Children" and "Theme Recognition". Includes a survey of the instruments of the orchestra. A clever and helpful way to promote the records RCA Victor was selling and, given the date of this edition is 1931, I could not have asked for a better source of information on the records Cecilia could have bought for Airey.]
Combs, Josiah H., ed. by D. K. Wilgus
FOLK-SONGS OF THE SOUTHERN UNITED STATES
(Austin TX: The University of Texas Press, for the American Folklore Society, 1967)
[Odd, scholarly book with the prejudices of its time and based on the 'Anglo Saxon' myth of the forebears of the South.]
Copland, Aaron
MUSIC & IMAGINATION
(New York: Mentor Books, 1964)
[A short book on how to appreciate music, addressed to the intelligent and talented listener. Gulp!]
Dempf, Linda
The Woman's Symphony Orchestra of Chicago. Notes: Music Library Association
(Volume 62, Number 4, June 2006)
[Good short history of a women-only orchestra. Women were excluded from professional symphony orchestras because women were not to be seen outside the home, were not to be visible, were not considered to have the stamina and strength to play professionally, and the usual line handed out. From the 1890s to the 1920s, full women-only orchestras were usually found in big cities. It was only when women began to be accepted into the all-male orcestras that the need for all-women orchestras began to fade. But it took the recent 'invisible' auditions to bring women up to equal numbers.]
Dickinson, Edward
THE STUDY OF THE HISTORY OF MUSIC
(New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1931 c1908)
[Starts with "primitive music" and goes to the Middle Ages by way of the Assyrians and Romans. A whole chapter on the violin's rise and dominance (yay!) and then solid chapters on European music to the early 20th century. A set of lectures that reads like it. But I was reading the 1931 edition, so it worked for me.]
Fay, Amy, ed. Fay Peirce
MUSIC - STUDY IN GERMANY
(New York: The Macmillan Company, 1922 c1880)
[Letters from Germany from late 1861 to 1875, by a young American woman. I read it to understand a little bit about the music world that Airey's teachers would have come from.]
Fux, Johann Joseph, edited by & trans. Alfred Mann
CONCERT GUIDE: HANDBOOK FOR MUSIC LOVERS
(London: J. M. Dent & Sons, 1965)
[All the standards are covered here: the great symphonies, concertos, and so on, with a look at the structure and instrucments of the orchestra.]
Gehrkens, Karl Wilson
TWENTY LESSONS IN CONDUCTING (The pocket music student)
(New York: Chas. H. Ditson & Co., 1925)
[Another book that existed at the time of my story, giving me insight into the orchestra. But honestly, could anyone learn conducting from a small handbook?]
Goepp, Philip H
GREAT WORKS OF MUSIC
(New York: J P Lippincott Company, 1925)
[In my efforts to get to know what Americans would know of music, and what music there was to know, I read a lot of books published before 1931. This one covers the main repertoire. D'Indy is a name that soon fell out of favour, but the rest (Mahler and so on) are still going strong.]
Gollancz, Victor
JOURNEY TOWARDS MUSIC
(London: Victor Gollancz Ltd, 1964))
[The eminent publisher describes how he developed his love of music, especially opera. I read it because he was doing this journey of his in the first half of the the 20th century, and so gave a picture of music culture at the time. His description of the Salzburg Festival of the early 1930s immediately had me imagine Airey there.]
Haas, Karl
INSIDE MUSIC
(New York: Anchor Books, 1991 c1984)
[General introduction to music, instruments, and the development of European music, for the beginner.]
Hill, Ralph (ed.)
THE CONCERTO
(London: Penguin Books, 1952)
[Covers all the piano, violin, and cello concertos of the time, that is, early 1950s. Worked for me for this story, but a little tough on the clarinet, oboe, and so on.]
Hill, Ralph (ed.)
THE SYMPHONY
(Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1951)
[One of the typical books that guided the generation of radio listeners and record buyers who wanted to educate themselves in classical music.]
Holmes, G. Augustus and Frederick J. Karn
THE ACADEMIC MANUAL OF MUSICAL INFORMATION
(London: A. Weekes & Co. Ltd, 1945)
[A slim volume covering metre, accent, time, rhythm, ornament, intervals, and training the ear. Packs a lot in.]
Holst, Imogen
AN ABC OF MUSIC
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1963)
[Not a simple guide for the beginner, but a study of technical aspects of music, such as modal scales, dissonance, counterpoint, modulation, and so forth, with musical examples. Useful short book.]
Hopkins, Antony
SOUNDS OF MUSIC. A Study of Orchestral Texture
(London: J. M. Dent and Sons Ltd, 1982)
[Hopkins was a conductor, among other things, and here he gives interesting insights into how orchestras do what they do, with a history of the orchestra and a study of the major composers.]
Hopkins, Antony
TALKING ABOUT MUSIC. SYMPHONIES, CONCERTOS AND SONATAS
(London: Pan Books, 1971 [this edition combines three separate, earlier books])
[As a composer and conductor, Hopkins is able to speak about the selections he has chosen under each type of composition from a coductor's point of view. He is a very good, clear writer.]
Hopkins, Antony
THE DENT CONCERTGOER'S COMPANION
(London: J. M. Dent, 1993 [this edition combined two separate, earlier books])
[Hopkins was a pianist, conductor, composer, and music reviewer for the BBC, which means his insights are backed by deep knowledge. He also writes well, with useful small details. Here, he looks at a selection of pieces by major composers.]
Horowitz, Joseph
CLASSICAL MUSIC IN AMERICA: A History of Its Rise and Fall
(New York: W W Norton & Company, 2005)
[Huge book covering a huge subject. I don't think he gives Maud Powell enough credit for her efforts to enlighten Americans, but to let him off the hook, he is focusing on concert halls and orchestras.]
Howes, Frank
FULL ORCHESTRA
(London: Secker & Warburg, 1942)
[A history of the orchestra and its development, followed by a look at every instrument to be found in the modern version.]
Hull, Kenneth C.
LILY MAY: A LEGEND IN OUR TIME. The nation's first all girl string band, Coon Creek Girls
(Self-published, 1998)
[A booklet outlining the importance of the Coon Creek Girls in the history of country and western music. Its subtitle is Pioneer Women in Country Music and the Coon Creek Girls certainly were.]
Illing, Robert
A DICTIONARY OF MUSIC
(Harmondsworth Mddx: Penguin Books, 1950)
[Similar to the Oxford Companon to Music (see below): it covers all major musical forms, musical terms, and composers. Nice little pocket paperback.]
Kenneson, Claude
MUSICAL PRODIGIES. Perilous Journeys, Remarkable Lives
(Portland OR: Amadeus Press, 2003)
[The book focuses on child wunderkind who were hothoused by their parents into becoming practising and performing machines. Children can be astounding technicians, but this is not what music is about. The prodigies covered here often had a troubled transition to independence and adulthood. In a sense, Airey is the opposite of a prodigy: she herself has the hunger and has put on the pressure.]
Kent, Greta
A VIEW FROM THE BANDSTAND
(London: Sheba, 1983)
[A personal memoir of a woman musician, mostly of her family's and her own involvement in British women's bands. I wanted to read about women musicians.]
Lebrecht, Norman
THE MAESTRO MYTH
(London: Simon & Schuster UK Ltd, 1992)
[The title suggests that the idea of the 'maestro' is a myth, but all he questions is if some conductors live up to their billing and fees. Covers the same period as 'When the music stops...' [see below] but concentrates on the rise of the idea that the conductor is a magician who can conjure sounds from that lumpen mass, the orchestra. Lebrecht doesn't always seem to know the meanings of the words he uses, and he strives for witty word-play that usually falls dead on the page, but his concern that orchestras can suffer because the maestro at the podium is sucking out their life-blood is a point that needs to be made.]
Lebrecht, Norman
WHEN THE MUSIC STOPS...
(London: Simon & Schuster UK Ltd, 1997)
[His thesis is that classical music is going to hell in a handbasket because people are making money out of it instead of pursuing it as a holy vocation, a spiritual path. Well, yes. Sadly, music is a human invention and can be dragged into the mud like any other human invention and musicians are but human. I hate the Government-handout and corporate-subsidy culture as much as Lebrecht, because it reduces music to 'output', but every endeavour, including classical and rock music, will always have its pure pockets of music for music's sake, just as does art, dance, and scientific thought. Religion has fallen by the wayside and literature and music seem now to have to take that higher sphere, but although music is 'spiritual', there were professionals hustling a penny, crown, florin, sou, and kopeck long before modern times.]
Macpherson, Stewart
CAMEOS OF MUSICAL HISTORY
(London: Winthrop Rogers Edition, 1937)
[The author wrote many guide books on how to appreciate music, how to teach music to children, and other worthy endeavours. This one gives potted histories of the great personalities of the history of music, with respectful and judicious remarks, and is a hard book to find; mine was a lucky second-hand purchase.]
Malone, Bill C.
COUNTRY MUSIC USA
(Wellington, Northants: Equation, 1987; British reprint of the original University of Texas Press edition, 1985)
[Solid and serious history. Section on "hillbilly" music, a term he notes first used within the record industry in 1925, and not widely known by the southern mountain people until a little later. He also mentions, at least, the restrictions on women playing country music without a chaperone of some sort, usually a male relative.]
Malone, Bill C.
SINGING COWBOYS AND MUSICAL MOUNTAINEERS: Southern Culture and the Roots of Country Music
(Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1993)
[This is a more focused book looking at how the music arose from specific Sotuhern culture and how that was used and abused, and also shaped by outside expectations of what "Southern" was.]
McKinney, Howard D
DISCOVERING MUSIC: A course in music appreciation
(New York: American Book Co., 1934)
[Another of the books roughly contemporary with the time of the story I read to get into the musical minds of the era. Quite a nice little introduction.]
Mobbs, Kenneth
The British Clavichord Society at Haslemere: the work of Arnold Dolmetsch. British Clavichord Society Newsletter
(No. 4, February 1996)
[Notes of a meeting of the society, where various instruments and their octave ranges were discussed. In the story, Mrs Vernelle's clavichord has 62 keys, so she has enough range to accompany Airey.]
 
Moore, Gerald
AM I TOO LOUD? The Memoirs of a Piano Accompanist
(London: Penguin Books 1974 c 1962)
[Amusing recollection of one of the greatest accompanists of his day. Gives some juicy as well as some appreciative portraits of the musicians with whom he played. A little about Menuhin. He mostly played with singers. I thought his views on accompanying would be interesting, and they were, as are his views on what makes a truly great musician.]
Nissel, Muriel
MARRIED TO THE AMADEUS. Life with a String Quartet
(London: Giles de la Mare Publishers Ltd, 1998)
[Read for insights into the travelling professional muscian's life, which my story touches upon. The Amadeus Quartet flourished much later, but some realities of the peripatetic musician's experience are timeless.]
O'Connell, Charles
THE OTHER SIDE OF THE RECORD
(New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1947)
[O'Connell worked in the recording industry, that is, for record companies (Victor and then RCA-Victor) from 1924 to the 1940s. Extremely entertaining tell-it-allfrom this central figure in the recording industry about the personalities he had to manage, as well as the technical details of his job. I gather it caused on stir on publication; hardly surprising.]
Peterson, Richard A.
CREATING COUNTRY MUSIC: Fabricating Authenticity
(Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997)
[Looks at how the image of the hillbilly was developed for musical stars of old-time and country music. Even the cover shot on my edition shows three of the four of a string band dressed in cartoonish "hillbilly" outfits; the guitarist, in suit and bow tie, resisted. Well-chosen photograph, as it sums up the book's point.]
Redfield, John
MUSIC: A SCIENCE AND AN ART
(New York: Tudor Publishing, 1928)
[The science part is about how a school of music should be a laboratory and the musicians a manufacturer. This is taking the cult of business in the 1920s to new heights, but not so strange when one considers that one of the decade's bestsellers was all about Jesus as CEO.]
Research Council of the Music Supervisors National Conference
SURVEY OF COLLEGE ENTRANCE CREDITS AND COLLEGE COURSES IN MUSIC
(New York: National Bureau for the Advancement of Music, 1930)
[No stone left unturned! The date of publication persuaded me this book might be useful. An educational administrator's book, it lists every college in the USA that taught music in 1930 and its entrance credits and graduates. Not the most interesting of reads, but it confirmed that music was taught at the University of Tennessee and Maryville College at this time. Maryville College is not the Collines Female Academy, which Cecilia attended, but somehow it was nice to know that music was taught in the place that is vaguely in the same geographical location as Avender.]
Rosen, Charles
THE CLASSICAL STYLE. Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven
(London: Faber and faber, 1972)
[This deeply erudite pianist and scholar had very distinctive thoughts on these three composers and the book had huge influence. I read both to understand Mozart from a musician's point of view and simply for the pleasure of being exposed to a great mind's considered throughts. This is a must-read book for anyone seriously interested in concert music. Absolutely authoritative.]
Sanders, Alan
WALTER LEGGE: WORDS AND MUSIC
(New York: Routledge, 1998)
[Legge was a major figure in the recording industry in the 20th century. Record companies always had power, and that power could be used perniciously, but they could also be a force for good, shaping and promoting musicians who really did need shaping and helping (not Airey, of course). Legge's passion for good music superbly recorded is shown here, and we get some of Legge's own articles.]
Scholes, Percy A.
THE OXFORD COMPANION COMPANION TO MUSIC, 10th edition, Revised and edited by John Owen Ward
(London: Oxford University Press, 1978 c1938)
[The standard reference book for music if you can't afford the huge Groves multi-volume encyclopedia. A bit dated, but every musical term is here. I like this edition especially for the startlingly bad "portraits" of famous composers The frontispiece is Beethoven; it could scare a young child away from concert music forever.]
Schubert, Franz, ed. G. Buonamici
FOUR IMPROMPTUS FOR THE PIANO Op. 90
(Score. London: Chappell & Co. Ltd, 1939, c1897)
[Cecilia plays Schubert several times in the story, although I don't name the pieces she plays. Schubert was considered suitable only for amateur players until as late as the 1940s.]
Schumann, Robert, ed. Harold Bauer
PAPILLONS FOR THE PIANO Op. 2
(Score. London: Chappell & Co. Ltd, 1944)
[Cecilia plays Schumann in the story, admittedly not these specific pieces, but I like them and they are something she has played in her past, so I indulged myself. I like the fact that an English music publisher brought out a German composer in 1944.]
Shaw, Arnold
THE JAZZ AGE: Popular Music in the 1920s
(New York: Oxford University Press, 1987)
[The "Jazz" in the title suggests that this will be the focus, but it is a more widely ranging book. I found the Spaeth (see below) better, because closer to the actual time.]
Sharp, Cecil and Maud Karpeles
80 APPALACHIAN FOLK SONGS
(Winchester MA: Faber and Faber, 1968)
[American edition of London printing of same year. A rare book. Reading the words reminds one that the tune is all.]
Spaeth, Sigmund
A HISTORY OF POPULAR MUSIC IN AMERICA
(New York: Random House, 1948)
[Detailed decade-by-decade review of the common or popular music of the USA, that is, ballads, sheet music, songs, show tunes, jazz and dance. Comprehensive, interesting, and ends with the glee-club and vocal music fad of his time of writing. While exhibiting the prejudices of his time, he nevertheless covers African-American composers with more depth and nuance than I expected.]
Trotter, James M.
MUSIC AND SOME HIGHLY MUSICAL PEOPLE. Remarkable Musicians of the Colored Race
(Boston: Lee and Shepard, Publishers, 1881 c1875)
[An overview and short biographies of a range of African-American classical musicians of the time, often with reproduced programme notes to prove that they did play, say, Mendelssohn and Gounod to large audiences.]
Veinus, Abraham
VICTOR BOOK OF CONCERTOS
(New York: Simon and Schuster, 1998, 1931, 1932)
[I found his section on Mozart's concertos illuminating.]
Welch, Roy Dickinson
THE APPRECIATION OF MUSIC
(New York: Harper & Brothers, 1927)
[A book from the time of the story, and a very useful and informative primer. I enjoyed it.]
Welch, Roy Dickinson
THE STUDY OF MUSIC IN THE AMERICAN COLLEGE
(Northampton, MA: Smith College, 1925)
[Music as a college course is much different now than then, and I needed to know about the then.]
Westerman, Gerhart von
CONCERT GUIDE: A HANDBOOK FOR MUSIC-LOVERS
(London: Sphere Books Ltd, 1969 c1951)
[Solid, dense history of concert music, the main composers, the main compositions.]
Winn, Edith L.
HOW TO STUDY FIORILLO
(New York: Carl Fischer, 1910)
[A detailed review of Fiorillo's studies for the student of the violin. This showed me how little pieces that concentrate on technique, but which are still music, teach in two ways: how to do double-stops or staccato or legato, and also how to make these technical aspects the servants of the composer's musical intent.]
Wolfe, Charles K.
GRAND OLE OPRY: THE EARLY YEARS, 1925-1935
(London: Old Time Music, 1975)
[Most books on the Grand Ole Opry gallop through its long history, but I wanted to know in detail how the Grand Ole Opry of Airey's time worked, what she would have heard whenever she had access to a radio (not often), and how she might have approached it, so this book was a godsend.]
Wood, Henry J.
MY LIFE IN MUSIC
(London: Victor Gollancz, 1938)
[Autobiography of an amazing, admirable musician and man. He worked from his own notes, memorabilia, and clippings to recall past years, but his book is never anything but entertaining. He strives to be generous to all with whom he performed. It is clear that he was a doggedly hard worker, profoundly musical, and haunted by the 'what if' he had not stayed with the Proms. But the Proms are a greater enduring memorial to him than any set of recordings with any other orchestra in the world. Fun fact: Airey plays in the 1932 Proms as a last-minute substitute. Her first professional appearance!]
 

Violin: Players, Instrument, Compositions for Violin

Auer, Leopold
VIOLIN MASTER WORKS AND THEIR INTERPRETATION
(New York: Carl Fischer, Inc., 1925)
[Covers all the then big pieces, including those no longer consiered in the first rank, e.g. Joachim's concerto. He addresses the Bach Chaconne as a separate piece (I discuss this in "About the book", and he also discusses what he calls, at this date, Bach's "Six Solo Sonatas." Good detail for a period performance; Airey learned them about the time Auer's book came out.]
Auer, Leopold
VIOLIN PLAYING AS I TEACH IT
(New York: Dover Publications Inc., 1980 c1921)
[Legendary Hungarian teacher of legendary violinists, such as Jascha Heifetz, Mischa Elman, Nathan Milstein, Toscha Seidel, and Efrem Zimbalist. He was appointed to the Saint Petersburg Conservatory as a teacher and spent most of his life there. His students amazed the world with a 'Russian' style of playing, which emphasised technical accuracy (e.g double stops, trills) and personal interpretation. He was also a performer.]
Bach, J. S, ed. by Eduard Herrman
SONATAS AND PARTITAS FOR THE VIOLIN
(Score. New York: G. Schimrer, Inc, 1900)
[Slim edition that holds these deathless masterpieces. Truly, musical notation is one of humanity's greatest inventions.]
Bachmann, Alberto
AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE VIOLIN
(Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 2008 c1925)
[Superb coverage of all aspects of the violin and violinists up to that time, which is just six years short of the date of my story. He mentions what seems like every woman violinist known.]
Barnard, Charles
CAMILLA: A TALE OF THE VIOLIN
(Boston: Loring Publisher, 1922 c1974)
[A biography of Camilla Urso (1840-1902), a French violinist who emigrated to the USA, worked as a violinist, apparently more of a "jobbing" performer than a high-classical one, who traveled around the country and then overseas, gradually becoming recognised for her real talent. A hard-working professional.]
Beethoven, Ludwig van
VIOLIN CONCERTO IN D MAJOR op61
(Score. London: Boosey & Hawkes, n.d.)
[One of this publisher's "pocket scores" and at the time (i.e. in the olden days before free scores were available on the internet) these little complete scores would have been great for musicians short of cash.]
Brahms, Johannes
VIOLIN CONCERTO IN D MAJOR, OP 77
(Score. London: Penguin, 1954)
[Nice little pocket edition of the full score. If forced to choose, this would be my favorite violin concerto.]
Brook, Donald
VIOLINISTS OF TODAY
(London: Rockliff, 1948)
[Little biographies of a number of leading violinists of the day, with not a bad word to say of any of them, and always mentioning their non-musical interests (cars seem to be a special fiddlers' hobby, perhaps because it doesn't endanger the hands?) and covering musicians who have fallen out of the public memory. Includes a number of women, the great Ginette Neveau among them, who died the next year.]
Burton, Humphrey
MENUHIN
(London: Faber and Faber, 2000)
[A kindly biography based heavily on Menuhin's own bibliography, but with corrective detail.]
Chapin, Anna Alice
THE HEART OF MUSIC: The Story of the Violin
(New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1921)
[A popular history of violins from early days, reverential about Stradivarus. The sort of book that would be in a music store in, say, Avender in 1921.]
Courvoisier, Karl
THE TECHNIQUE OF VIOLIN PLAYING. THE JOACHIM METHOD
(Mineola NY: Dover, 2006 c1897)
[Joachim's method was his own, based on his own bodily abilities, and later violinists suggest that no one can duplicate his technique, but can only be inspired by it.]
Cox, Bob L.
FIDDLIN' CHARLIE BOWMAN: An East Tennessee Old-Time Music Pioneer and His Musical Family
(Knoxville TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2007)
[The author works hard to make a case for Bowman as a significant contributor to the rising country-music industry. Bowman was a Tennessee fiddler, and so I was interested in him, but it did strike me that Bowman was there, worked hard, made records, adopted the "hillbilly" shtick as required, and was a very good fiddler, and that was it. And nothing wrong with that.]
Cremer, Oscar
HOW TO BECOME A PROFESSIONAL VIOLINIST. Tips and Talks
(London, "The Strad" Magazine and Horace Marshall & Sons, 1924)
[This book addresses how to get work in any band or orchestra, and there were more choices back then than simply a symphony orchestra. He addresses music halls and picture show orchestras.]
Cutter, Benjamin
HOW TO STUDY KREUTZER: A Handbook for the daily use of violin teachers and violin students
(Boston: Olver Ditson Comapny, 1903)
[Very technical, looking at the left hand especially, but he notes in his introduction that any student will been heard to improve if playing very good teaching material, and a student consciously seeking self-improvement will improve exponentially.]
Dvořák, Antonin
VIOLIN CONCERTO in A Minor, Op 53 and ROMANCE FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA in F Minor, Op. 11
(Score. Mineola, New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 2006)
[Complete scores for the orchestra. The Romance figures in the story. I thought I should see what is played. The Dvořák concerto is a favorite of mine, so I was delighted with this edition.]
Faber, Toby
STRADIVARIUS. Five Violins, One Cello and a Genius
(London: Pan Books, 2004)
[An appreciation of the great violins, with a look at the craftsmen of the time, the history of certain instruments, the myths that built up around anything by Stradivarius, and a very sensible conclusion that any Stradivarius instrument played today is not really the original, as there is no "soul" that makes them great, only updates of wood and varnish, until they are like the proverbial "my father's knife", which is the same, although both hilt and blade have been replaced several times.]
Flesch, Carl, and Eric Rosenblith
THE ART OF VIOLIN PLAYING
(London: Carl Fischer, 2000, 193?)
[Flesch was one of the greatest violin teachers of the twentieth century. This book is very dense, and not for the mere reader learning how violin is played, but for the student and teacher.]
Flesch, Carl F.
AND DO YOU ALSO PLAY THE VIOLIN?
(Stroud: Toccata Press, 1990)
[The author's father was a violinst, but more famously a violin teacher. His students included Ida Haendal and Ginette Neveu, and this book is about growing up among young geniuses. The son admits being under his father's shadow, but he also made a life of his own and comes across as a thoroughly decent and wise man.]
Galamian, Ivan
PRINCIPLES OF VIOLIN PLAYING AND TEACHING
(London: Faber and Faber, 1964)
[Very technical, very detailed and practical. Some commentators on the violin see his influence as fell, as he was apparently not interested in adapting his technique to his students, but I can't help feeling that he corrected a lot of slack and sloppy playing in his time.]
Gerardy, Riki
TALKS WITH EMANUEL HURWITZ: 82 Years with the Violin
(London: Zolia, 2006)
[Interviews with and reminiscences of a jobbing British violinist who played in both orchestras and smaller groups, including his own quartet, after WWII. Good to have that perspective.]
Gill, Dominic (ed.)
THE BOOK OF THE VIOLIN
(New York: Rizzoli, 1984)
[Popular essays covering all aspects of the violin. Heavily illustrated. For someone who wants to know more about the violin without too much hard work. Very pleasant overview.]
Goldmark, Carl, ed. Leopold Auer
CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND PIANO
(Score. New York: Carl Fischer, Inc., 1922)
[I could not find an affordable full orchestral score for the Goldmark violin concerto, so got the adaptation for violin and piano, edited by the legendary teacher Leopold Auer. The piano part comes first, then the violin part; we know what Airey thinks about that.]
Grimson, Samuel B, and Cecil Forsyth
MODERN VIOLIN PLAYING
(New York: The H. W. Gray Co., 1920)
[Deals with theory and practice of the left and right hands. Nice little section on spiccato.]
Haendel, Ida
BACH, BEETHOVEN, WITH CHAUSSON
(DVD. Pleasantville NY: Video Artists International, Inc., 2005)
[Video recording of Haendel, in her late 80s, playing live. Includes an interview with her. She plays, as a stand-alone piece, Bach's Chaconne from Partita No. 2 for solo violin. Her face, at its end, is that of someone who has gone through a profound experience.]
Haendel, Ida
Ginette Neveu. The Strad
(Vol 120, no. 1434, October 2009)
[A short article about one great woman violinist by another. Haendel, as a child and young woman, knew Neveu. In Haendel's own autobiography she writes admiringly of Neveau while wildly signalling Neveau's lesbianism with all the usual code-words. Nevertheless, this article is a wonderful appreciation by one who out-lived all of her contemporaries about one who died all too soon.]
Haendel, Ida
WOMAN WITH VIOLIN
(London: Victor Gollancz, 1970)
[Autobiography of this great violinist that is almost unbearable to read, because she reveals, apparently unknowingly, and in the face of third-party insight she herself records, a career cruelly hindered and wounded by her father's limitations and her own lack of self-knowledge. Would she have been in the pantheon of her century's most well-known virtuosos had she been better managed, or had known herself? We will never know. I can't help feeling that she would have served herself, music, and women in music, much more had she been willing to face unpleasant truths. But Menuhin doesn't either. I should also add that I saw her three times playing, in her very late years,knowing that I had been in the presence of greatness. Luckily she was interviewed, and documentaries made when she was in her late years, but to listen to her in her prime, go to this interesting performance of Kreisler's Praeludium and Allegro, which will tell you all you need to know. She knew Kreisler and rather nicely salutes his own creamy style.]
 
Huscher, Philip
KARL GOLDMARK - VIOLIN CONCERTO IN A MINOR, OP28
[PDF: Program notes, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, no date, but after 1984 ]
[Says many lovely and true things about this concerto. see source PDF]
Lochner, Louis P.
FRITZ KREISLER
(New York: Macmillan Company, 1952)
[Solid biography, shading only now and then towards a critical view. He lets the actions of the man speak, and we can do the translating. Kreisler was a dominant, globally-known and revered player for all of this career. He seems to have thrived on charisma and natural talent; he was the least-driven virtuoso of his time. No fanatical practice marathons for him.]
MacLeod, Joseph
THE SISTERS D'ARANYI
(London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd, 1969)
[The sisters were talented muscians all, but I was interested in Jelly (or Yelly), a violinist who played with Pablo Casals and had music written for her by leading musicians of her day, including Ravel. At the time of my story, she was about 20 years older than Airey, so a woman soloist Neihoff mentions.]
Martens, Frederick H.
STRING MASTERY
(New York: Frederick A. Stokes Co., 1923)
[Interviews with leading violinists of the day on specific techniques and aspects of playing.]
Martens, Frederick H.
VIOLIN MASTERY: Interviews with Heifetz, Auer, Kreisler and Others
(Mineola NY: Dover, 2006 c1919)
[Little interviews of the current virtuosi of 1918/1919 by a respectful journalist. Every one of them is great and approachable, every one seems to have given the author a signed publicity postcard of self. Frontispiece of of Eugène-Auguste Ysaÿe, the famous Belgian violinist.]
Mendelssohn, Felix
VIOLIN CONCERTO IN E MINOR op64
(Score. London: Boosey & Hawkes, n.d.)
[Another of this publisher's "pocket scores" I was able to pick up second-hand, and wonderful to have the full score of one of my favorite violin concertos.]
Menuhin, Yehudi, ed. by Christopher Hope
THE COMPLEAT VIOLINIST: Thoughts, exercises, reflections of an itinerant violinist
(New York: Summit Books, 1986)
[The elderly Menuhin addresses violinists from a long life of being one. The yoga and healthy food regime that caused him to be considered, during his life, a "crank", can now be recognised as a thoughtful approach to physical health and flexibility for the musician. He has a good phrase: "The violinist is that peculiarly human phenomenon distilled to a rare potency—half tiger, half poet."]
Menuhin, Yehudi, and William Primrose
VIOLIN AND VIOLA
(London: Kahn & Averill, 1991 c1976)
[Given that Menuhin also set up a music school, one can see here his urge to teach. This practical book covers specific technique, such as holding the bow, pressures, use of the hands, and so on. The distinguished violist William Primrose has a smaller section in the book.]
Menuhin, Yehudi
UNFINISHED JOURNEY
(London: Futura, 1978)
[The myth of Menuhin's own life served up in sensitive prose. His greatness as a human being comes through, but if this is indeed how he saw his life, then his truths were greatly filtered by his need to have them true. It comes across as a sad life.]
Monsaingeon, Bruno (written and directed by)
THE ART OF VIOLIN
(DVD. NVC Arts, 2001)
[Video compilation of the 20th century great violinists, including archival footage, interviews, and thoughts of later violinists on earlier ones. Includes such players as Elman, Franscescatti. Heifetz, Neveu, Oistrakh, and Stern.]
Mozart, Wolfgang A. edited by Rudolf Gerber
CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA IN D MAJOR. K218
(Score. London: Ernst Eulenburg, 1973)
[More a reading copy than a playing copy. This is the concerto Airey first hears on Cecilia's record player in the tobacco shed, and which she plays in her concert.]
Mozart, Wolfgang A.
VIOLIN-KONZERT. G-DUR KV 216
(Score. London: Ernst Eulenburg, 1933)
[This has a German title, although published in London, but of course it was originally German. I listened to all the violin concertos by Mozart but kept coming back to KV218, so this one was simply a pleasure.]
Mozart, Wolfgang A.
VIOLIN CONCERTO IN Minor KV 219
(Score. London: Ernst Eulenburg, 1933)
[Another of Mozart's concertos for violin that I enjoyed, but finally did not choose for Airey.]
Palmer, Tony
MENUHIN: A FAMILY PORTRAIT
(London: Faber and Faber, 1991)
[A sour little book that claims to be probing, but which serves up the tired fact that great men have failings, that Menuhin clung to comforting versions of his life, and that his children resented his greatness while living off him. Not the exposé the author thought he was writing.]
Pearce, J. H.
VIOLINS AND VIOLIN MAKERS. Biographical Dictionary of the Great Italian Artistes
(London: Longman and Co., 1866)
[All the great Italian violin makers, including the Amati family, Guarnerius, and Stradavarius family. Very reverential.]
Petrucci Music Library
IMSLIP: IMSLIP
[Gigantic website of out-of-copyright or released sheet music and scores. From it I downloaded:
Bach. Sonata I in G minor BWV 1001, ed. Leopold Auer
Bach. Sonata IV (that is, Partita No. 2) in D minor BWV 1004, ed. Leopold Auer
Bach. Sonata VI (that is, Partita No. 3) in E major BWV 1006, ed. Leopold Auer
Beethoven. Sonata No. 7, Op.30, no. 2
Handel. Sonata IV in D major, HWV 371, ed. Leopold Auer
Mozart. Andante, Menuett und Rondo aus der Serenade No. 7
Paganini. Caprice No. 10 in G minor
Suk. Appassionato, from Four Pierces Op.17, no 2
Tchaikovsky. Canzonetta from Violin Concerto op. 35, for violin. ed. Edith L. Wynn
Vitali. Chaconne for Violin & Basso Continuo, ed. Richard Kram)]
Popovic, Marina
P. I. TCHAIKOVSKY CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA, op35
[PDF: Master's Thesis, Faculty of Fine Arts, Dept of Music, University of Agder, Norway, 2012]
[An analysis of the composition and a comparison of two recorded performances, that of David Oistrakh and Janine Jansen.]
Robjohns, Sydney
VIOLIN TECHNIQUES: Some difficulties and their solution
(London: Oxford University Press, 1946 c1930)
[A compiled series of articles aimed at students and less experienced violin teachers. I bought it chiefly because of its original publication date.]
 
Roth, Henry
VIOLIN VIRTUOSOS: From Paganini to the 21st Century
(Los Angeles: California Classic Books, 1997)
[Roth does exactly what the titles says: offers a short essay and appreciation of each of the virtuosi from the time the virtuoso became a broad cultural phenomenon to modern day (he died in 1999). His judgements are good, his verdicts fair.]
Saint-Saens, C.
INTRODUCTION ET RONDO CAPRICCIOSO pour violin et orchestre
(Score. Paris: A. Durand et Fils, 1909)
[This violin and piano version by Georges Bizet.]
Schubert, Franz, edited by O. Thümer
FOUR IMPROMPTUS FOR THE PIANO Op. 90
(Score. New York: G. Schirmer, Inc, 194? c1897)
[Cecilia plays these and other Schubert pieces for solo violin throughout the period of the story. I am happy she likes Schubert, as I love him.]
Schubert, Franz, edited by G. Buonamici
MOMENTS MUSICAUX Op. 94
(Score. London: Augener Ltd, 1927 c1913)
["Musical Moments" is such a modest title for these small masterpieces, which are among my favorite pieces of music.]
Schumann, Robert, edited by Harold Bauer
PAPILLONS OP. 2 FOR THE PIANO
(Score. New York: G. Schirmer, Inc, 1944)
[Cecilia plays these pieces, as well as other Schumann, at points during the story. I always note when German music is published during war time. Some things, and music is one of them, transcend the evil times through which they pass. When we fight for civilisation, this music is part of what we mean by it.]
Sibelius, Glazunov, Elgar
GREAT TWENTIETH-CENTURY VIOLIN CONCERTOS. In Full Score
(Score. New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 1995 c1903, 1905, 1910)
[Complete scores for the orchestra. None of these concertos feature in the book, but when Dr. Neihoff was considering Airey's assertion about her future, he would have had these concertos in mind, and so I thought I should, too.]
Smith, Robert
HOW TO PLAY THE VIOLIN — EZ (EASY) METHOD
(New York: Wm J. Smith Music Co. Inc., 1923)
[A small book that cannot possibly teach anyone how to play the violin, but it almost could. I like its optimism.]
Schröder, Jaap
BACH'S SOLO VIOLIN WORKS: A PERFORMER'S GUIDE
(London: Yale University Press, 2007)
[A detailed look at the why and how of playing Bach's six Partitas and Sonatas for solo violin. I could not take details from this for use with Airey's playing, as he was writing ninety years after the date of the story, with all we know now about baroque methods, Bach's life, and music history. Auer's more contemporary guide was what I relied upon, but this book gave me insights into Airey's thinking, which would have been unique in her time.]
Schwarz, Boris
GREAT MASTERS OF THE VIOLIN
(New York: Touchstone, 1985)
[This seems a labour of love by a devoted fan. He seems tremulously eager to be awed by the violinists he interviews. They sit down! They serve coffee! He covers some violinists other interview books do not, so that was a plus.]
 
Somerville, I. M.
KREUTZER AND HIS STUDIES
(London, "The Strad" Magazine and Horace Marshall & Sons, 1924)
[Kreutzer's exercises for student violinist are more than mere practice pieces, but are little works in and of themselves. This guide looks at each individually and gives both thoughts on them and playing advice.]
Steinhardt, Arnold
INDIVISIBLE BY FOUR
(New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1988)
[An insight into how musicians make music and how they work through each other to the music. Given that Airey does indeed form a quartet to play with when she is not playing solo, I thought I should be informed.]
Steinhardt, Arnold
VIOLIN DREAMS
(New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2006)
[When I had just begun writing, this was the first book I read for information about playing the violin. It is an autobiography based around the theme of the violin as inamorata, but actually gives a picture of a craftsman coolly choosing his tools, which I think is more interesting than high emotion. It gives a good view of violin training in the post-War period, as tutoring by individual masters was giving way to schools, institutes and universities. (He covers this also in his book 'Indivisible by Four, above.) The greatest gift of the book, however, was the CD included that offered two versions of Bach's Partita no 2, recorded in 1966 and 2006. I was not especially familiar with the Sonatas and Paritias, so I played this CD over and over, almost as background music, until I found myself stopping whatever I was doing to listen to it. It was the dozens of times I heard the Ciaconna, so subtly different between the two recordings, that made me understand its greatness, and I will always be indebted to Steinhardt for this.]
Stern, Isaac
MY FIRST 79 YEARS
(New York: Da Capo Press, 2000)
[Autobiography, 'written with Chaim Potok', by the prodigy who followed Menuhin from a boyhood in San Francisco into the world. Stern appears to see himself as a jobbing fiddler with regrets about the lack of early training. His music is always sweet and moving, and this part of him comes out in his book. I gather that life-long friends were distressed when he divorced his devoted wife of many years, who had helped him build his community of musicians and was, as it were, the spirit of the group that gathered round him. This book, with its dedication to his second wife and an ecstatic account of her, does seem rather an old man's fond, dazzled, embarrassing last love.]
 
Stoeving, Paul
THE VIOLIN: ITS FAMOUS MAKERS AND PLAYERS
(New York, C. H. Ditson & Co., 1928 c1904)
[This is the book Cecilia buys on the day after she has first met Airey.]
Stowell, Robin (ed.)
THE CAMBRIDGE COMPANION TO THE VIOLIN
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006 c1992)
[Scholarly essays on a range of topics concerning the violin.]
Szigeti, Joseph
JOSEPH SZIGETI ON THE VIOLIN
(London: Cassell, 1969)
[Deeply learned book displaying all of Szigeti's fastidiousness and dedication to music.]
Szigeti, Joseph
WITH STRINGS ATTACHED
(London: Cassell, 1967 c1949)
[Autobiography. Szigeti is not a man to display his emotions, so we do not get a lot of the inner man, but his observations of the world of music and his clear revulsion of the crowd-pleasing music of his prodigy days are in any case more interesting. It is also interesting to read of his praise of Soviet Russia, knowing what we know (and what he must have known) (and by "interesting" I mean WTF). However, it is not often that an autobiography closes, as this one does, with an appendix that covers somebody else: Bartok, Szigeti using his last words in his own book to marvel at the greatness of another.]
 

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Bowman, Elizabeth Skaggs
LAND OF HIGH HORIZONS
(Kingsport TN: Southern Publishers, Inc., 1938)
[A celebration of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park just as the final arrangements were being put into place. She hiked and photographed the park and wrote in the slightly breathless way nature-lovers did back then. Her quick history of the settling of the park area is full of ignorant hillbilly stories, but that was the usual attitude, so she can't be singled out.]
Campbell, Carlos C.
BIRTH OF A NATIONAL PARK IN THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS
(Knoxville TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1998 c1960)
[The book's strapline is "an unprecedented crusade which created, as a gift of the people, the nation's most popular park." Campbell was a tireless worker for the making of the park and was instrumental in its creation. He was a naturalist and a keen hiker. He shows the men involved in promoting the park, how the land was purchased, and the political manoeuvrings required for final success. Campbell was locally-born, and it is hard not to feel his love for the mountains and his ardent desire to preserve their beauty. However, you had to have a strong will and a strong stomach, given the special interests at work and the way they rode rough-shod over the local people. He and his companions were so sure they were right.]
Campbell, Carlos C. ed. by Rebecca Campbell Arrants
MEMORIES OF OLD SMOKY
(Nashville TN: self-published by editor, 1999)
[Campbell wrote down these memories in 1967 but could not find a publisher, so his granddaughter published them herself. The book is about happy memories hiking in the Great Smokies, with chapters on the animals and people he encountered.
Davis, Hattie Caldwell
REFLECTIONS OF CATALOOCHEE VALLEY AND ITS VANISHED PEOPLE IN THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS
(Maggie Valley NC: self-published, 1999)
[Davis collected reminiscences from family and friends. Covers the history of this region from the Carolina side, with family details and is very good on the impact of the national park. She writes from her own and her family's experience. Lots of photographs of the houses swept away or left to rot when the park came in. These were modern houses, as in Cades Cove, and a modern farming community, not relics of the past in log cabins living marginal lives. That community was entirely obliterated by the national park.]
Dunn, Durward
CADES COVE. THE LIFE AND DEATH OF A SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN COMMUNITY 1818-1937
(Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1989)
[Most of the book is about the settling of the cove and the lives of the families there. But his subtitle is the purpose of the book: how the community was forced to move out. The village buildings and all modern houses were removed, leaving only the picturesque log cabin "pioneer" fantasy cove behind.]
Dykeman, Wilma and Jim Stokely
HIGHLAND HOMELAND: THE PEOPLE OF THE GREAT SMOKIES
(Washington, DC: National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1978)
[Wilma Dykeman was a local woman who wrote perceptively of her area.]
Dykeman, Wilma and Jim Stokely
MOUNTAIN HOME: A PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK
(Gatlinburg TN: Great Smoky Mountains Association, 2009)
[I thought this might be a souvenir photograph book when I bought it, but it turned out to be a good history from the pre-European invasion to modern day. A serious amount of the book is, quite rightly, given to the Native Americans of the region. I note that the Walker Sisters, who famously had a fly-brush for their dinner table, have a section. Photos of the modern park feature all those lovely old barns and log cabins, and I ground my teeth.]
Frome, Michael
STRANGERS IN HIGH PLACES: THE STORY OF THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS. Revised edition
(Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1992 c1966)
[The author's interest in the Great Smokies seems to have arisen from his interest in national parks. He gives a brief history the Great Smokies and then looks at those who wrote about them, those who studied their geology, and then the slow, inexorable in-coming of the national park, with very good sections on the timber companies who owned great swathes of land as well as the famers and smaller landowners. He brings the history up-to-date, looking at a national park now swamped with cars and visitors that have turned what was supposed to be a green oasis into a traffic jam. He is very clear about the destruction of the environment, which I certainly saw with my own eyes.]
King, Veta Wilson
MOUNTAIN FOLKS OF OLD SMOKY
(Sevierville TN: Mountain Folks Publishing, 1997)
[Memories gathered by the author from friends and neighbours who lived and worked in the mountains before the coming of the national park. As I have mentioned elsewhere, there are details from memories that you would probably not find from any other source, such as using planks from the ceiling for coffins, as these were dry wood.]
Mason, Robert Lindsay
THE LURE OF THE GREAT SMOKIES
(Boston: The Riverside Press, Cambridge, 1927)
[This rambling history and description of the Great Smoky Mountains seems very much to have been inspired by the coming of the park, and I suspect it was written to provoke interest in and support for the park, or to jump on the bandwagon of the idea's growing popularity.]
National Park Service, Division of Publications
THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK
(Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1981)
[Well-illustrated book about the park, its ecology, and its history, with scary photos of the logging that impelled naturalists to call for a national park. It is very much of the mentality that celebrates, yet looks down on, the mountaineers past and present. If you want to see good photographs, you can download a digital copy from Project Gutenberg.]
Oakley, Wiley
ROAMIN' & RESTIN' With the Roamin' Man of the Smoky Mountains
(Sevierville TN: Oakley Enterprises, Inc., 1986 c1940)
[Oakley was a genuine man of the mountains who worked as a guide in the national park and by writing articles for his local paper. He developed himself into a "character" and that worked for him. He tells some good stories.]
Pierce, Daniel S.
THE GREAT SMOKIES. FROM NATURAL HABITAT TO NATIONAL PARK
(Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2001)
[Covers the pre-park era, but concentrates on the development and the boosting of the idea of the park, both as a preserver of a special natural area, and the bringer-in of tourist dollars, showing the see-saw of interests. Also covers the park to modern day.]
Shields, A. Randolph
THE CADES COVE STORY
(Gatlinburg TN: Great Smoky Mountains Natural History Association, 1981 c1977)
[The author was born in Cades Cove and lived in Maryville once everyone was cleared out of the cove. He covers the history of the families in the park, and it is clear that he sees the coming of the park as the destruction of the community, which of course it was.]
Thornborough, Laura
THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS. Revised and expanded edition
(Knoxville TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1967 c1937)
[The author says that she was born within sight of the Great Smokies and has a cabin there. She describes the park's natural riches, descibes hikes, and in all ways is an enthusiastic booster, although the "busy" park she describes in 1942 (in her revised edition) is idyllic emptiness compared to current days.]
Williams, Michael Ann
GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS FOLKLIFE
(Jackson MS: University Press of Mississippi, 1995)
[Covers all aspects of life of the mountain people, including the Cherokee, such as music, medicine, food, building styles, dance, and speech patterns. Looks at how 'folkways' are performed in the national park.]
 

African Americans

Egerton, John
SPEAK NOW AGAINST THE DAY. The Generation before the Civil Rights Movement in the South
(Chapel Hill NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1994)
[The book covers 1932-1954, so outside of the time of my story, but introduces why activists came to the south, or arose in the south, both within the African-American and the white communities, to address oppression and exclusion. Because there was so bloody much.]
Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of Tennessee
SLAVE NARRATIVES: Volume XV - TENNESSEE NARRATIVES
(Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1941)
[Very difficult to read, mostly because of what the witnesses tell us, and partly because their narratives are written in that phonetic dialect approach that turns their way of speaking English into "slave talk." But an essential document, for it captured the voices of a generation soon to pass away. The narratives are not about the mountain area, as slavery was not practised in the uplands, for no other reason than the white settlers there did not need the sort of intensive labour cotton, tobacco and so on required.]
Greene, Lorenzo J. and Carter G. Woodson
THE NEGRO WAGE EARNER
(Washington DC: The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, Inc., 1930)
[A detailed study carried out over three years to show that things changed for American-Americans between 1890, 1910 and 1930. The biggest change noted was the shift from agriculture and servant jobs to others, and clearly most of these new jobs were in the north. I confess I had to check, while reading, that the publisher, the ASALH, was really the publisher of this given some of the language (Black servants not knowing how to work, or bunking off work, that sort of thing, with no context), but it was, and I see it as reflecting the attitudes of African-American leaders at a time when they were not immune to outside pressures or attitudes. Dr. Woodson, one of the authors of this book, established Black History Week.]
Inscoe, John C. ed.
APPALACHIA AND RACE: The Mountain South from Slavery to Segregation
(Lexington, KY: The University Press of Kentucky, 2005)
[Essays covering a range of topics, from coal-mining to the Reconstruction era, including a look at the same educational "outreach" efforts by outsiders. It does strongly dispel the notion that the mountain people were mostly or all white descendants of pure Anglo-Saxon pioneers.]
Johnson, E.A.
LIGHT AHEAD FOR THE NEGRO
(New York: The Grafton Press, 1904)
[An appeal to enlightened white people, by a white person, presented through fiction, asking them to try to solve the "Negro Problem" (that is to say, one presumes, unenlightened white people). This quotation will suggest how well the book was overcoming its own problem: "I can see no reason for their having had slaves at the outset. Why couldn't Negroes have served us, from the first, as freemen just as they did after their emancipation?" (p.107)]
Rollins, Judith
BETWEEN WOMEN: DOMESTICS AND THEIR EMPLOYERS
(Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1985)
[As part of her research, in the early 1980s, the author took on domestic work with white female employers. She also interviewed African-American workers. This book doesn't therefore cover the region or the time my story is set, but I had every confidence that the attitudes of the employers Rollins worked for would not have been alien to southern white female employers in ther 1920s and 1930s.]
Smith, Lillian
THE KILLERS OF THE DREAM
(New York: Norton, 1978)
[A Southern white woman who based her political and moral arguments on the evils of segregation on her own experiences (the book came out in 1949), so it sheds light on what a thinking, politically-minded woman who grew up in the 1920s and 1930s would come out with. Is it racist? Yes, in spite of her best intentions, it's still there. But I read the book and include it here as an insight into Cecilia's own mind-set. An interesting note: Lillian Smith was a life-long lesbian.]
Starke, Catherine Juanita
BLACK PORTRAITURE IN AMERICAN FICTION: Stock Characters, Archetypes and Individuals
(New York: Basic Books, Inc, 1971)
[Covers a long period, and writers both Black and white. What white readers lapped up as the truth, and what any African-American endured as racism on the page, is all here. Grotesque stereotypes gradually slipped into more subtle (well, comparatively) Othering. A hard-to-get book.]
Tucker, Susan
A Complex Bond: Southern Black Domestic Workers and Their White Employers. Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies
(Vol. 9, No. 3, 1987)
[Based on interviews of African-American women and white women, the author looks more at what African American women thought about their jobs than what their white employers thought, but including both made a wry contrast: the white women felt the Black women liked them and loved their children, whereas the Black women were very clear that they were doing was work, and unsparingly observed their employers' small and often sad lives.]
Tucker, Susan
TELLING MEMORIES AMONG SOUTHERN WOMEN: Domestic Workers and their Employers in the Segregated South
(Baton Rouge LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1988)
[Tucker, a white scholar, uses interviews of women's memories of their (African-Amercan women) service or their (white women) being served. A book-length expansion of the article above, and proving her points again with unarguable evidence.]
Turner, William H. and Edward J. Cabbell eds.
BLACKS IN APPALACHIA
(Lexington, KY: The University of Press of Kentucky, 1985)
[An early book on the subject that looked at where African-Americans lived in the uplands and how they made their living. Given that this was largely in coal-mining, and coal-mining is not something my story focuses on, I could only read for my own broader awareness. Very good book.]
Van Wormer, Katharine S. and David W Jackson, Charletta Sudduth
THE MAID NARRATIVES
(Baton Rouge LA: Louisiana State University Press, 2015)
[The stories are African-American women's mothers' and grandmothers' (and sometimes their own) with the obvious points of the narratives spelled out as only academics can do (the sociological version of "close reading", but the book is vaulable for the stories. These women were mostly day-workers and did not live on the premises of their employer. It didn't make the work any easier, or at attitudes better.]
 

Nature and Geology

Adkins, Leonard M.
WILDFLOWERS OF THE BLUE RIDGE AND GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS. Photos by Joe Cook
(Birmingham AL: Menasha Ridge Press, 2005)
[Beautiful guide book beautifully put together. Each flower has a full page photo and detailed notes. A delightful book to look at and to use. Only fault is lack of an index.]
Alsop, Fred J.
BIRDS OF THE SMOKIES
(Gatlinburg, TN: Great Smoky Mountains Association, 2003)
[Attractive bird identification book, small enough for a pocket, well laid out, as with all this admirable little series.]
Blackwelder, Eliot and Harlan H. Barrows
ELEMENTS OF GEOLOGY
(New York: American Book Company, 1911)
[Covers the earliest formation of rocks to the cave men. One of the books Lorimer owned.]
Dunbar, Carl O.
HISTORICAL GEOLOGY
(New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1955 c 1915)
[Covers earliest rock formations right up to early hominids. Another of the books Lorimer would have owned, in its first edition. A boy who read about dinosaurs was always going to have trouble with a fundamentalist step-father.]
Ferriss, James H.
The Great Smoky Mountains. The Nautilus
(Vol. XIV, No. 5, September 1900)

[The Nautilus was a learned magazine devoted to the study of shells.]
Hutchins, Ross E.
HIDDEN VALLEY OF THE SMOKIES, with a naturalist in the Great Smoky Mountains
(New York: Dodd, Mead, 1971)
[A study of the geology and plants, with many photographs.]
Kemp, James Furman
A HANDBOOK OF ROCKS: For use without the petrographic microscope, 6th edition completely revised and edited by Frank F. Grout
(New York: D. Van Nostrand Company Inc., 1946 c1906)
[This book had an edition in 1927; it was this or the first edition that was Lorimer's bible. I have the later edition.]
Kemp, Steve
TREES OF THE SMOKIES
(Gatlinburg, TN: Great Smoky Mountains Association, 2006)
[Identification book, small yet with a photo and line drawing on each page. I used this constantly while walking in the Great Smokies.]
Lahee, Frederic H.
FIELD GEOLOGY
(New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company Inc., 1923)
[For the professional or aspiring professional geologist of the time. Bought so I had the knowledge the characters would have had; this was one of Lorimer's precious books, which he would have had as a battered second-hand gift.]
Linzey, Alicia V. and Donald W. Linzey
MAMMALS OF GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK
(Knoxville TN: The University of Tennessee Press, 1971)
[Useful. Does the job.]
Luther, Edward T.
OUR RESTLESS EARTH: The Geologic Regions of Tennessee
(Knoxville TN: The Universiy of Tennessee Press, 1977)
[Slim book that covers the entirety of the state. A useful introduction.]
Moore, Harry and Fred Brown
DISCOVERING OCTOBER ROADS: Fall Colors and Geology in Rural East Tennessee
(Knoxville TN: The Universiy of Tennessee Press, 2001)
[Covers more than just the Great Smokies, but a nice introduction, concentrating on geology. What a pity none of my story covers the autumn, as I could have painted some word pictures of the foliage.]
Ries, Heinrich and Thomas L. Watson
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY
(New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1914)
[Solid in every way, including weight. Very dense read. You have to be into engineering geology to wade through it all. Top quality illustrations.]
Stupka, Arthur
NOTES ON THE BIRDS OF GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK
(Knoxville TN: The University of Tennessee Press, 1977 c1963)
[The great naturalist of the Great Smokies on its birds, so a very academic study. Without a single illustration.]
Stupka, Arthur
TREES, SHRUBS, AND WOODY VINES OF GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK
(Knoxville TN: The University of Tennessee Press, 1989 c1964)
[An academic study and hard work, but by the foremost naturalist of the Great Smokies, so a must-read. Photographs not very good. But I could find no other book on vines.]
Swallowtail Garden Seeds
GARDEN SEEDS (www.swallowtailgardenseeds.com)
[I needed to know names of garden flowers that would grow in the eastern Tennessee region and to know what they looked like, and this website was exceedingly handy.]
Tilley, Stephen G. and James E. Huheey
REPTILES & AMPHIBIANS OF THE SMOKIES
(Gatlinburg, TN: Great Smoky Mountains Association, 2006)
[Identification book, small enough for a pocket, nicely done.]
Williams, Dan D.
THE FOREST OF GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK
(Athens GA: Possum Publications, 2010)
[Great book packed with information, especially useful to me because it was specific about the elevations for each type of tree.]
 

Farming, Forestry, Timber Trade

Adams, Edward F.
THE MODERN FARMER IN HIS BUSINESS RELATIONS
(San Francisco CA: N. J. Stone Company, 1899)
[Very detailed consideration about all the issues of being in a business as a farmer, written by a famer. His thoughts on the wife of a farmer (pp89-91) are well worth reading.]
Bennett, M. K.
Trends of Yield in Major Wheat Regions since 1885. Wheat Studies of the Food Research Institute  (Vol XIV, No. 3, November 1937)
[I like to be thorough.]
Bunker, Page
FORESTRY IN THE SOUTH
(Washington DC: The American Tree Association, 1928)
[About the business of forestry, published by the association that promoted the forestry industry. Trees as product.]
Ferguson, John Arden
FARM FORESTRY
(New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1916)
[Addresses the woodlot, which is a lot or piece of land with wood, also known as a stand of wood, as a commercial concern. For farmers and land-owners.]
Mattoon, Wilbur R. and William B. Barrows
MEASURING AND MARKETING FARM TIMBER. Farmers' Bulletin 1210
(Washington DC: United States Department of Agriculture Forestry Service, 1921)
[Produced to help the farmer understand his cash crop of wood to help him stop losing money, by giving information on how to assess trees and how to get a fair price in the market.]
National Lumber Manufacturers Association
THE STORY OF WOOD
(Washington DC: The National Lumber Manufacturers Association, 1927)
[Pamphlet with stirring illutrations: pioneers! Colonial houses! Gracious interiors! Endless jobs! Renewable resource! Is there no economic or social blessing wood cannot bestow?]
Noyes, William
WOOD AND FOREST
(Peoria IL: The Manual Arts Press, 1921 c1912)
[Covers tree species, the use of the forest, natural enemies (from wind to fungi) and forest management.]
Pack, Charles Lathrop
THE SCHOOL BOOK OF FORESTRY
(Washington DC: The American Tree Association, 1922)
[It is easy to forget that anyone could buy acres of untouched forest and completely destroy it in ways that ruined the land, the rivers, the water-table, and the healthy chances for re-growth. Foresty was intended to encourage good practices, and this book makes earnest arguments for why, to quote the titles of chapter XIV, XV and XVI, "the United States should practice forestry...the lumberman should practice foresry [and]...the farmer should practice forestry." The author advocates "putting wood to work".]
Schmidt, Ronald G. and William T. Hooks
WHISTLE OVER THE MOUNTAINS: TIMBER, TRACK AND TRAILS IN THE TENNESSEE SMOKIES
(Yellow Springs, OH: Graphicom Press, 1994)
[Thorough and very good book of the Little River Lumber Company and Little River Railroad. Excellent illustrations. Highly recommended.]
Seymour, E. L. D. ed.
FARM KNOWLEDGE. In two volumes
(Garden City NY: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1922)
[Absolutely massive and detailed. "Prepared exclusively for Sears, Roebuck And Co.", so you can bet all the lovely farm equipment mentioned was to be found in the Sears, Roebuck catalogue. The Fitches would not have been able to afford most of what was recommended, and I suspect that was true of many farms of the time, especially through the agricultural depression of the 1920s. Chapter 12 in Volume II, The Farm Woman would daunt the stoutest-hearted wife, and yet the illustrations show gracious and unwilted specimens going about their business.]
Snow, Charles H.
THE PRINCIPAL SPECIES OF WOOD: THEIR CHARACTERISTIC PROPERTIES
(New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1903)
[Exhaustive list of species, where these are found, commercial uses, weight of seasoned wood in pounds per cubic feet, and other details. A real page-turner. Breathless excitement to the last.]
U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service
TREES OF THE FOREST. Their Beauty and Use
(Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1971 c1964)
[The government supports the use and preservation of trees, and encourages everyone to behave prudently and with an eye to profit. Nice.]
Wallace, Henry A. and Earl N. Bressman
CORN AND CORN GROWING 5th edition, revised by J. J. Newlin, Edgar Anderson, Earl N. Bressman
(New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1949)
[Yes, it is that exciting. I wanted to prove to my satisfaction that corn could be grown at the elevation of the Fitch farm, and so I did.]
 

Food, Vehicles, General

AGRICULTURAL ALMANAC, FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1931
(Lancaster PA: John Baer's Sons Inc., 1930)
[Offers the sun rising and setting times, phases of the moon, "probable state of the weather" and helpful advice on growing plants. Also covers "Opening canned food", "Kerosene as a fly destroyer", recipes and jokes, including not a few racist ones.]
THE LADY MAGAZINE
(London: The Lady, 1931, 1932)
[This hardy perennial of a magazine is a British legend that began in 1885 and is still going. Its core was fashion of the day, reporting on duchesses and then telling the reader how to make her own or obtain something close to high fashion. The Classifieds concentrated on house servants, cooks, companions, nannies and the like, which people laugh at or scorn now, but which was a great resource for those looking for work as well as for those seeking workers. I found one that would make a sizzling short story. Give it time. I looked at the issues for 4 June, 11 June, and 16 July 1931, and also 17 March, 7 April, 12 May, and 26 May 1932.]
TENNESSEE ATLAS & GAZETEER
(Yarmouth MA: DeLorme, 2007)
[I used this when driving around east Tennessee, and you can see the ridge-and-valley of that part of the state very clearly.]
Bernstein, Irving
THE LEAN YEARS. A History of the American Worker, 1920-1933
(Chicago IL: Haymarket Books, 2010)
[The 1920s is remembered as an age of excess, and yet farmers and factory workers did not share much of that prosperity, as this book explains.]
Brox, Jane
BRILLIANT: THE EVOLUTION OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHT
(London: Souvenir Press, 2010)
[Insightful, thorough look at the development of light, from candles to whale oil and kerosene lanterns to gaslight and finally electricity, and their social impact. Really worth reading. I would love to read her update on LEDs and the ubiqitous "power on" lights that now shine on from every electronic device until the heat death of the universe, apparently.]
Chapman, Robert L.
NEW DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN SLANG
(London: The Macmillan Press, 1987)
[When one is seeking crude words to be said in nasty situations, one can do no better than American slang.]
Clark, Thomas D.
PILLS, PETTICOATS AND PLOWS: The Southern Country Store
(Indianapolis, IN: The Bobs-Merrill Company, 1944)
[A good popular history with lots of, to me, fantastic details. Photos also very useful.]
Dabney, Joseph E.
SMOKEHOUSE HAM, SPOON BREAD, & SCUPPERNONG WINE: The Folklore and Art of Southern Appalachian Cooking
(Nashville TN: Cumberland House, 1998)
[Wonderful book effortlessly combining recipes, history of the dishes and ingredients, pen-portraits of beloved family members and friends, and a salute to his culture. A thoroughly well-designed and enjoyable book to visit again and again.]
Episcopal Church (USA), The Protestant
THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER
(New York: James Pott & Company, 1929)
[When Cecilia or I refer to sacraments and psalms, I wanted to make sure I was using the most current version of the Book of Common Prayer for her time.]
Funderburg, Ann Cooper
SUNDAE BEST: HISTORY OF SODA FOUNTAINS
(Madison WI: Popular Press, 2001)
[A good history of the soda fountain and its place in people's lives and thus in American culture.]
Gracyk, Tim
A History of Portable Talking Machines Tim's Phonographs & Old Records
[Nice short history with illustrations and a diagram of the parts of a portable record player.]
Hering, Richard, edited and revised by Walter Bickel
HERING'S DICTIONARY OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN COOKERY
(Rotherham UK: Virtue Books,)
[A reference book originally published in German in 1907 as Lexikon der Küche for the hotel, restaurant and catering trade. If you want to know how to cook, for example, calf's ears "Dressel" or "Fried" or "Grilled" or "Italian Style" or "Poulette" or "Toulouse Style" or "Turtle Style", this book must absolutely be on your shelf. His listing of cooking styles for crêpes feels endless.]
Hoffmann, Frank, ed.
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF RECORDED SOUND
(New York: Routledge, 2005)
[Delivers exactly what it says: an encyclopedia of everything you need to know about recordings. Massive.]
Houk, Rose
FOOD AND RECIPES OF THE SMOKIES
(Gatlinburg TN: Great Smoky Mountains Association, 1996)
[Small cookbook apparently compiled for visitors to the park, clearly collected locally. Useful.]
Jones, Jacqueline
THE DISPOSSESSED: AMERICA'S UNDERCLASSES FROM THE CIVIL WAR TO THE PRESENT
(New York: Basic Books, 1992)
[Looks at both the white and black working, rural classes in the south, and how the myths built up around their poverty helped keep them down and also undermined them and their views and memories of themselves.]
Kilmer, Dr. (putative author)
DR. KILMER'S SWAMP-ROOT ALMANAC AND WEATHER FORECAST FOR 1931
(Binghampton NY: Dr. Kilmer & Co., 1930)
[An almanac (pamphlet) that has not only the usual punched hole near the spine, BUT the original string FROM which to hang it. I was thrilled. "Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root" was a diuretic, which proudly boasted that it had no opium, morphine, shtrychnine or saltpeter in it, but did have 9% alcohol, so we can detect the reason for its popularity. No photographs in this almanac, but all sorts of drawings of native Americans, even "red Indian" astrology signs on the cover, and a dream interpreter. Dreaming of bacon, for instance, denotes disappointment "to eat it, unnecessary trouble.". How far has bacon traveled in public opinion since those dark days!]
Kimes, Beverly Rae
STANDARD CATALOG OF AMERICAN CARS 1805-1942, 3rd edition
(Iola WI: Krause Publications, Inc., 1996)
[This reference book is one of my treasures. Exhaustively detailed, impeccably thorough.]
Kirke, Betty
MADELEINE VIONNET, 3rd edition
(San Francisco CA: Chronicle Books, 2012)
[Chanel might be the more well-known designer of the period between the two world wars, but Vionnet was, to my eye, the one who designed the more beautiful clothing. She was famous for her bias-cut dresses and fashion designers up to this day use the technique to bring a flowing grace to their gowns. In 1931, a Vionnet gown would have been startlingly modern on an American girl, but an American girl with superior taste would not have hesitated.]
Larned, Linda Hull
THE NEW HOSTESS OF TODAY
(New York, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1917)
[A cherished book I have owned for ages. Recipes and advice for the dinner party or social function, with my copy heavily annotated by what looks like the same hand throughout, adding reminders and comments, writing out recipes ("Fruit punch for fifty persons") and with many pasted-in articles from magazines and newspapers, including one on the new electric chafing dish, with an illustration from, I think, the mid-1920s. The book has a whole section on chafing-dish recipes for the old-style chafing dish, including deviled almonds with cheese, lobster creole and sardines in cream sauce, the last surely an acquired taste.]
LORD, The
HOLY BIBLE. King James's Version
(London: Eyre and Sppttiswood Ltd, 1978)
[The version of the Bible that would have been used by most Protestants at the time, and certainly in the American Episcopal Church and the various Baptist churches of the farming and mountain communities in 1931.]
Lustig, Lille S., and Claire Sindheim, Sarah Rensel
THE SOUTHERN COOK BOOK OF FINE OLD RECIPES
(Reading PA: Culinary Arts Press, 1935)
[It seems to have been compulsory for any cookbook of recipes from the American South to include "comical" drawings of African Americans, and this is chock-full of them. It boasts on the cover that it includes "50 Poems and Spirituals." Yes, it does, as well as well as endless racists slurs. But if you want a lot of recipes, this small book supplies them. It is good to keep examples of this sort of book because there may be a time when racism has ended and we need an archive of the casual horrors perpretrated in the past.]
Maltin, Leonard
THE GREAT AMERICAN BROADCAST. A Celebration of Radio's Golden Age
(New York, New American Library, 1997)
[Useful introduction to the rise and spread of commercial radio.]
Michelin
SUISSE NORD [Map 551 Regional]
(Paris: Michelin Cartes et Guides, 1987)
[I wanted to have a map of the part of Switzerland that the Fitsches came from in the 1820s.]
Miles, Dr. (putative author)
NEW WEATHER ALMANAC AND HAND BOOK 1931
(Elkhart IN: Dr. Miles Medical Co., 1930)
[Produced by the same company that manufactured the patent medicine nostrums of "Dr. Miles." His almanac was not just useful for phases of the moon (turns out the moon wasn't in the sky when I wanted it to be), but as a snapshot of a time. This almanac would have been prepared in 1930. It is full of photographs, giving a good range or female hairstyles, women's hats, and men's hairstyles. These would have been chosen to be "ordinary". No matter what the fashions were in New York, we are still in the late 1920s as far as hats and hairstyles went. Dr. Miles sold "Anti-Pain Pills" and "Nervine".]
Morgan, Alfred Powell
HOME MADE ELECTRICAL APPARATUS
(New York: Cole & Morgan, Inc. 1918)
[A small handbook for boys interested in making acid batteries, transformers, and so forth, with diagrams. Published in 1918, this was an old, battered book by 1931. Lorimer has it in his collection.]
Mroz, Albert
THE ILLUSTRATED ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN TRUCKS AND COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
(Iola WI: Krause Publications, Inc., 1996)
[Covers 1891-1996, so not huge amounts of detail, but certainly comprehensive and with useful photographs.]
 
Mulragh, Jane
VOGUE HISTORY OF 20TH CENTURY FASHION
(London: Bloomsbury Books, 1982)
[Heavily illustrated and informative. It is a big book, but the text packs in a lot of detail.]
 
O'Neil, Darcy
Cherry Phosphate. The Art of Drink
(Website: https://www.artofdrink.com/soda/cherry-phosphate)
[Now this, this, is Cecilia's cherry phosphate. Oh, to live at a time when you had to woman-up to drink a soda!]
O'Neil, Darcy
FIX THE PUMPS: The History of the Soda Fountain
(Self-published: Art of Drink, 2010)
[If you want to know even more about how original sodas could introduce you to chemicals you never thought you could ingest without batting an eye, read O'Neil's entertaining book and try some of the safer recipes.]
Schabilion, Robert J. "Bob"
DOWN THE CRABTREE
(AuthorHouse: self-published, 2009)
[A really dandy book about minerals in North Carolina, with a good section on the uses of feldspar, including the smoothing of rough skin. Airey uses powdered feldspar to sand her hands.]
Sinclair, Andrew
PROHIBITION: THE ERA OF EXCESS
(London: Faber and Faber, 1962)
[Contrary to the title, this is a serious academic study. Prohibition, in my opinion, was a good thing, in that it stopped the absolute domination of alcohol in so many men's lives, which led to violence, especially against women. Alcohol use after 1933 was never as appalling as the time before 1919.]
Skinner, Tina and Tammy Ward
FASHIONABLE CLOTHING FROM THE SEARS CATALOG: EARLY 1930S
(Atglen PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd, 2007)
[A generous and intelligent selection of material from the early 1930s, which is more helpful than costume and fashion books that cover the whole decade, leaving you unsure which date a hat is from. Sears catered to everyone but the upper classes; still, the fashions were always up to date.]
Soderland Village Drug, Sponsored by
The Drugstore Soda Fountain. Drugstore Museum
(Website: www.drugstoremuseum.com)
[A fun website page with photographs of soda fountains in drugstores, rescued by the Wayback Machine.]
Stieff, Frederick Philip
EAT, DRINK & BE MERRY IN MARYLAND: An Anthology from a Great Tradition
(New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1932)
[I bought this because, being published in 1932, it was contemporary to the time of the story, and I wanted details of the food that would be eaten by the well-to-do. This book is a collection of "family recipes" from the "grand old families" of Maryland, with drawings of their houses, mostly Colonial and early 19th century. It is larded throughout with denigrating images of African-Americans, depicting them as lazy and thieves, alongside the apparently approving depiction of smiling Black cooks and butlers. The charm of the old colonial Maryland's "great tradition" rather dims in the reading of this. The recipes, of course, are the creations of the African-American professional cooks in their work spaces.]
Sutherland, Daniel E.
DOMESTIC SERVICE IN THE UNITED STATES FROM 1800 TO 1920
(Baton Rouge LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1981)
[Covers the whole of the USA, both male and female servants, and Black, Asian and white servants, and looks at the issues arising from a country that stood for equality and yet where the well-off citizen expected to have servants and to treat them as underlings. Solution? Categorise some as "lesser humans." Focuses more on servants hired to lighten the woman's load and less about male servants than I had hoped.]
Trubert-Tollu, Chantal, Françoise Tétart-Vittu, Fabrice Olivieri, Jean-Marie Martin-Hattemberg
THE HOUSE OF WORTH: THE BIRTH OF HAUTE COUTURE 1858-1954
(London: Thames & Hudson, 2017)
[This famous fashion house was the first: to be a "destination", to make its own perfume, and so on. Its heyday was up to World War I, but it lasted until after WWII, and would have been the "go to" place for more conservative Americans, such as Cecilia's mother. Many of Cecilia's own clothes were ordered from Paris, and her perfume was a gift from her mother. This book is stupendously illustrated, and almost maddening in its gorgeousness.]
Welsh, Walter Leslie and Leah Brodbeck Stenzel Burt
FROM TINFOIL TO STEREO: The Acoustic Years of the Recording Industry, 1877-1929
(Gainesville FL: University Press of Florida, 1994)
[Good, thorough history from an American perspective.]
Wives of park service employees and their friends (I quote)
MOUNTAIN MAKIN'S IN THE SMOKIES: A Cookbook
(Gatlinburg TN: Great Smoky Mountains Natural History Association, 199? c1957)
[A book created for the gift shops of the Smoky Mountaisn National Park. It sells the pioneer ways of the mountain folk in the same way the preserved log cabins and old mill in Cades Cove sell a view of the lives of the people there. That said, the recipes are good. I noted the recipes for chestnut bread and salt-rising bread. The recipes date from the time of compilation, the late 1950s, not the pioneer days, although many are clearly old family recipes.]
 

Investments

Baruch, Bernard M.
BARUCH MY OWN STORY
(New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1970 C1957)
[Bernard Baruch was a speculator, "financier" (i.e. influential millionaire) and finally, in both world wars, an advisor on military spending and other matters to the presidents. He was born in South Carolina in 1980, and so, as a young man, would have been making his fortune on Wall Street under similar circumstances to those of Cecilia's Great Aunt Ruth, that is, during the utterly rapacious heyday of unfettered, unblushing avarice. Baruch learned early the lesson other successful speculators have learned to their profit: to avoid the rushes of blood to the head (irrational exuberance) of one's fellow gamblers and to educate oneself about the companies and sectors one is speculating in. Cecilia's Great Aunt was no less canny. Nor is Cecilia.]
Baruch, Bernard M.
BARUCH THE PUBLIC YEARS
(New York: Pocket Books, Inc, 1962)
[Having read of Baruch's early life, which contained all the racist references and bare-faced financial conniving one would expect, I wanted to find out how he ended up as an honoured stateman and international figure. Not quite as interesting reading as the first half of his life, although his views about organised labour are as palatable as his views on African-Americans. Thus are the great men of any nation, then and now: convinced of their rectitude, sagacity, and shrewdness, while perpetuating all the evils bedeviling their nations.]
Crump, Arthur, ed. by H. W. Rosenbaum
THE THEORY OF STOCK EXCHANGE SPECULATION
(New York: Jones Printing Co. Press, 1886)
[A British text enthusiastically taken up for the American market by the editor, who seems to have published it at his own expense. Contains much very good and timeless advice.]
Fowler, William Worthington
TEN YEARS IN WALL STREET or, Revelations of Inside Life and Experience on 'Change
(Hartford, CN: Worthington, Dustin & Co., 1870)
[Revelations in the title promised and delivered. Close-up view of the sordid doings in the Stock Market. Interesting chapter, wildly prejudiced, on women speculators.]
Hickling, John & Co.
THE ART OF SPECULATION AND SECRETS OF WALL STREET FULLY EXPLAINED
(New York: Russell Brothers, Printers, 1874)
[Pamphlet issued by a brokerage house to explain the terms and the way the stock market works, in a way that emphasises the profits to be made.]
Medbery, James K.
MEN AND MYSTERIES OF WALL STREET
(Boston: Fields, Osgood & Co., 1870)
[Solid explanation of how the business of stock speculation works during its first unpalatable heyday. This is Great-Aunt Ruth's book that Cecilia inherits.]
Smith, E. V.
PLAIN TRUTHS ABOUT STOCK SPECULATION. HOW TO AVOID LOSSES IN WALL STREET
(Brooklyn NY: 1887)
[Extremely plain speaking about how Wall Street works, with the word "rascal" used as needed, and gives examples of actual booms, crashes and manipulations to illustrate the actual amoral nature of the business.]

 


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